Holmes Chapel
01477 544554

Before and after surgery

Sadly our pets sometimes need to undergo surgery and we know it can be a worrying time. Here we hope to provide you with some reassurance and help on what to expect and what is involved pre and post surgery.

download hospital admission pdf

Hospital Admission

Important information for Hospital Admission. Please print a copy and bring with you on the day (include both pages)

**NO FOOD IS PERMITTED FROM 10PM THE PREVIOUS NIGHT, HOWEVER WATER IS PERMISSIBLE – PLEASE LEAVE YOUR PET’S WATER BOWL DOWN.***

We will have made an appointment for you to drop your pet off at the clinic, and during this we will explain what is planned throughout the day.

Please allow your pet to ‘spend a penny’, if possible before arrival.

For safety’s safe, please have your dogs on a lead and cats in their basket.

TRY NOT TO WORRY!

If you have any queries on the procedures, please discuss this with the admitting nurse.

Microchips can be placed whilst your pet is anaesthetised. If you would like this to be done please inform the admitting nurse.

On admission you will be offered a pre-anaesthetic blood sample for your pet, there is an additional charge for this.

Going Home:

Payment is expected at the time of collection. If your pet is insured please bring a claim form with you. Please read Cheshire Pet Terms & Conditions overleaf.

Full instructions on the post operative care of your pet will be given when you pick them up.

If you have any doubts, please don’t hesitate to contact us 01477 544 554

back to top
download general anaesthetic & sedation pdf

General Anaesthetic & Sedation

A general anaesthetic is performed for a variety of reasons; for operations, X rays, endoscopic examination, and dental treatment. During an anaesthetic your pet is asleep (unconscious), pain free and totally unaware of their surroundings. You will be asked to sign a form giving your consent to an anaesthetic. This will be fully discussed with you at the time so that we obtain your informed consent. Your pet is then weighed and admitted to the clinic. If a pre-anaesthetic blood sample is required this will then be taken and run. In most circumstances your pet will be given a pre-medication injection, which is a mild sedative. This reduces anxiety, reduces the dose of anaesthetic needed and eases recovery. A pain-killing injection is also given at this time to block the pain pathways and dramatically reduce post-operative discomfort.

An accurate dose of anaesthetic is calculated dependent on your pets weight, age, health and breed. The products used are of the highest quality and are human equivalents, which are safer for both your pet and our team, (Rapinovet and Isoflurane). Anaesthetics can only be administered by qualified veterinary surgeons. Your pet's front leg will have a small patch of fur clipped and the induction agent is injected into the leg vein. In a few seconds your pet is asleep. A breathing tube is placed into their windpipe and connected to the anaesthetic machine, which provides oxygen and anaesthetic gases to maintain unconsciousness. Your pet is then connected to a respiratory and cardiac monitor to monitor their breathing and heart rates and rhythms. A stethoscope tube is also placed in their throat to monitor the heart sounds directly.

Anaesthetic monitoring is performed by the qualified and fully trained nursing team and is a highly skilled task involving the monitoring of reflexes, temperature, heart and breathing rates and rhythms, gum colour to indicate circulation changes and pulse rate. The amount of gaseous anaesthetic given is adjusted according to any changes in the above. At the end of the procedure, the anaesthetic gases are switched off and your pet gently regains consciousness. Once swallowing reflexes return the tubes and monitors are removed. Your pet is then carried to their pen. It is crucial to monitor recovery closely particularly your pet's temperature, circulation and airways. Various methods are used to maintain body temperature during and after an anaesthetic, they include: the room temperature, electric pads, special bedding, space blankets, bubble wrap and microwaveable pads.

Sedation

Sedation is given for a variety of reasons including close skin and ear examination to claw clipping and stitch removal in fractious pets. During sedation your pet is not fully unconscious and is aware of their surroundings to a small extent. You will be asked to sign a form giving your consent to sedation. This will be fully discussed with you at the time so that we obtain your informed consent. Your pet is then weighed and admitted to the clinic. If a pre-anaesthetic blood sample is required this will then be taken and run. A sedative reduces anxiety and has mild pain relieving properties. As some procedures can be uncomfortable further pain relief is given by injection to block the pain pathways and dramatically reduce post-procedure discomfort. An accurate dose of sedative is calculated dependent on your pets weight, age, health and breed. Sedation monitoring is performed by the qualified and fully trained nursing team and is a highly skilled task involving the monitoring of reflexes, temperature, heart and breathing rates and rhythms, gum colour to indicate circulation changes and pulse rate. At the end of the procedure, the sedation can often be reversed and your pet gently regains consciousness. Your pet is then carried to their pen. It is crucial to monitor recovery closely particularly your pet's  temperature, circulation and airways. Various methods are used to maintain body temperature during and after an anaesthetic, they include: the room temperature, electric pads, special bedding, space blankets, bubble wrap and microwaveable pads.

back to top

Fluid Therapy

Intravenous Fluid Therapy

Your pet will have been admitted for a drip. Possible reasons for this is to treat dehydration, maintain blood pressure during an operation, replace lost electrolytes and fluids lost through illness e.g. vomiting and diarrhoea, kidney or liver disease and support the vital organs and circulation. Your pet will be admitted for `hospitalisation' where they will have a small patch of fur clipped from a front leg. A catheter is then placed into the leg vein and bandaged in place. The catheter is then connected via tubing `the giving set' to the drip bag where the appropriate fluids have been warmed to body temperature. Fluid therapy requires intensive monitoring and care by qualified staff, to ensure that the correct fluids, in the correct amount, at the correct rate are provided to your pet. The progress of your pet is monitored carefully for any changes and medicine that is required can often be provided directly through the drip.

Hospitalisation

Your pet will have been admitted to the clinic for observation, monitoring and appropriate treatment by qualified veterinary surgeons and nurses. Your pet will be housed in a heated pen with special bedding to keep them warm, dry and comfortable. Feeding will either be a special prescription diet appropriate to their illness, a convalescence diet or, wherever possible the food they are used to at home. Any medicine that is needed or any diagnostic tests will be discussed with you.

back to top
download dressings - what you need to know pdf

Dressings - what you need to know

Care of your pets dressing

Bandaging materials are very expensive, hence it is very important that dressings are properly managed once your pet gets home. THE BANDAGE MUST BE KEPT CLEAN AND DRY AT ALL TIMES. If you take your pet out in wet weather then cover the dressing with a strong plastic bag held in place with some sticky tape or an elastic band. THIS MUST BE REMOVED WHEN YOU RETURN HOME TO ALLOW THE BANDAGE TO BREATHE! Pets generally do not like bandages on their feet and so may try to interfere with the dressing! Elizabethan collars are available to prevent this. However, PERSISTENT CHEWING MAY INDICATE A PROBLEM WITH THE DRESSING OR UNDERLYING WOUND. If you have any doubts please contact the clinic. We would also like you to contact the clinic if any of the following occur:

  • The bandage slips or changes shape
  • Your pet chews the bandage excessively or shows signs of discomfort
  • The bandage smells or is soiled
  • Sores develop around the top of the bandage
  • The limb swells above or below the bandage
  • Your pet becomes depressed, feverish or loses appetite

If your pets toes have been left out of the bandage for monitoring these should be felt 3-4 times a day and they should feel warm.

back to top

After Dental Care

Your pets anaesthetic was maintained with Isoflourane, the safest inhalation anaesthetic agent available. Your pet may have a slight cough over the next 24 hours, this may be due to irritation from the tube placed within its windpipe. Your pet may have a shaved area on the foreleg, this is where the intravenous anaesthetic agent was injected. Following an anaesthetic it is best to feed a light diet or a small amount of normal diet. A highly digestible light diet can be provided if you prefer. Water should be provided in small frequent quantities. Cats should be kept indoors for at least 24 hours following an anaesthetic. They may be disorientated and their reactions slower than normal. Your pets teeth have been scaled and polished using equipment of a very high standard. The air compressed dental unit is similar to what may be used by your own dentist! If your pet has had teeth extracted you may notice they drool or seep blood during the evening (this may be more noticeable when they take a drink) if this becomes excessive please contact the surgery. Your pet may experience discomfort whilst eating over the next few days so biscuits may need to be introduced gradually. We can provide a soft lapable diet if this becomes a problem.
Home dental care is now essential to help prevent the build up of plaque and tartar. Plaque can start to build up 24 hours post scaling! We will discuss home care with you and provide a free check up in 6 months. Please read the information leaflets provided. Your pet has had 24 hour pain relief by injection. Your pet has had antibiotics by injection please continue with tablets tomorrow if any have been prescribed. An appointment for your pets check up should be made.

back to top
download after anaesthetics - small pets pdf

After Anaesthetics - Small Pets

Your pets anaesthetic was maintained with Isoflourane, the safest inhalation anaesthetic agent available for small pets. This helps minimise the risk. Rabbits may have a shaved area on the ear where the intravenous anaesthetic agent was injected. It is very important to keep your small pet warm. Outdoor pets such as rabbits and guinea pigs should be kept indoors overnight. Maintain a warm ambient temperature in the room where your small pet is housed. Normal food should be provided and fresh drinking water available. IT IS VERY IMPORTANT YOUR PET EATS AFTER AN ANAESTHETIC - ESPECIALLY RABBITS. Please monitor exactly what food is eaten over the next 24 hours and contact us if you're worried. If a dental procedure has been performed provide grated carrot / dandelions / fresh grass so it is easy to eat. It is also very important to monitor what is passed through the other end! Therefore clean out the hutch and monitor faecal output over the next 24 hours. If no pellets are passed please contact us as soon as possible.

After surgery a slight swelling and occasional discharge is not uncommon. If a large swelling or profuse bleeding occurs please contact us immediately. (A small amount of blood is a lot to a Hamster!) Please check the wound daily. If you use shavings or sawdust in the cage / hutch please remove them and use sheets of newspaper for absorbency and straw/hay for bedding. Shavings can irritate and stick to the wound. Your pet has received 24 hour pain relief by injection. Antibiotics have been given by injection. Please complete the full course of treatment if any has been prescribed. An appointment for your pets check-up should be made, there is no charge for this! If your pet has stitches they will need to be removed in 10 days.

back to top
download after anaesthetics - care pdf

After Anaesthetics - Care

Your pets anaesthetic was maintained with Isoflourane, the safest inhalation anaesthetic agent available. Your pet may have a slight cough over the next 24 hours, this may be due to irritation from the tube placed in its windpipe during the anaesthetic. Your pet may have a shaved area on the foreleg, this where the intravenous anaesthetic agent was injected. Following an anaesthetic it is best to feed a light diet or a small amount of its normal food. A highly digestible light diet can be provided if you prefer. Water should be provided in small frequent quantities. Cats should be kept indoors for at least 24 hours following anaesthetic. They may be disorientated and their reactions may be slower than normal. After surgery a slight swelling and occasional discharge is not uncommon. If a large swelling or profuse bleeding occur, please call the surgery immediately. Please check the wound daily. Please discourage your pet from licking, biting or scratching the wound as this can cause infection or premature removal of the stitches. Head collars can be provided if this becomes a problem. Please lead walk your dog until stitches are removed. Try not to let your pet climb stairs or jump. Cats may need to be kept indoors for 2-3 days to restrict their activity.

back to top
Calvin Marketing